The year was 1986. Around 40 people gathered from all over the United States, Canada and the UK to talk about organizing an international Eating Disorders Awareness Week (EDAW). NIED Co-founder Patti Perry was at that meeting along with three other Canadians, Dick and Mary Moriarty, who would go on to found the Bulimia Anorexia Nervosa Association (BANA), and the first Executive Director of the National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC),. “The idea was to increase awareness, to identify people who were struggling and to look at the needs of individuals in terms of treatment, because in 1986 there wasn’t a whole lot going on [in the Eating Disorder community], or people were just getting started,” Patti remembers.

At the meeting it was decided that attendees would go back to their cities, states and provinces to push to get EDAW recognized. Unfortunately, they found that getting even a day declared as EDAW was not as easy as they had hoped. “In 1986 it really wasn’t simple at all,” Patti says.

In 1988 NEDIC became the national coordinator for EDAW and various Eating Disorder advocacy groups, professionals and treatment centres in Canada started recognizing it yearly during the first week in February. Through the advocacy of NEDIC and other groups across the country EDAW slowly started to be officially recognized by municipalities, provinces and territories across the country. The Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland & Labrador, and most recently Ontario have all proclaimed EDAW.

Suzanne Phillips of NEDIC says it was an almost six-year journey to get EDAW proclaimed in Canada’s largest province, Ontario. The first thing they focused on was creating set dates nationally for EDAW, because previously they were floating dates starting on the first Sunday in February. “We had to build a case with everyone across the country to say look, we’ll have an easier time getting something [proclaimed] federally, provincially, if we can have set dates for EDAW,” Suzanne says. “We got everybody on board with that, so that was the first hurdle that we passed.”

In July 2015 both NEDIC and NIED started writing letters to MPPs and getting letters of support for the proclamation in Ontario. “It was a lot of calls, a lot of emails building up the number of people in Ontario and other community groups to also get on board with posing this ask,” Suzanne says.

Co-founders of NIED, Wendy Preskow and Lynne Koss, met with many MPPs to try and get them to take on the proclamation of EDAW as a private members bill. Although meetings went well, it seemed like all the MPPs had other priorities and EDAW never made it to the house. “It was very hard to find an MPP who did not already have a private member’s bill in the works,” Wendy says.

In 2018 Jill Andrew was elected to provincial parliament. Jill had been a long-time supporter of NEDIC and is the Co-founder of Body Confidence Canada, an organization that advocates for equitable and inclusive images, messages, practices and policies supporting body diversity. In 2018 Jill first championed Bill 61, to get EDAW proclaimed officially in Ontario, however it didn’t make it through the house. “There was that disappointment of getting things so far and then having what felt like a bit of a step back,” Suzanne remembers.

However, Jill didn’t give up. She brought Bill 61 back to parliament in 2020 and it passed unanimously across party lines on December 3, 2020, almost 35 years after the first meeting in Baltimore. “I believed EDAW would help bring attention to the diversity of people who experience Eating Disorders, including Black, and racialized women and girls, queer people, transgender people, disabled people and fat people,” Jill said in a press release after Bill 61 received Royal assent on December 8, 2020. “It will promote the ongoing need for culturally responsive resources for the treatment and prevention of Eating Disorders.”

Both Wendy and Suzanne agree that the proclamation of EDAW in Ontario from February 1-7 every year was a fantastic moment for Eating Disorder advocacy in the province. “It felt like everybody’s hard work was recognized.” Suzanne says. “It felt like individuals who are impacted by Eating Disorders had what they rightfully deserve, which is recognition. It’s a first step, and I think it was a very necessary good first step to give us the energy to keep going.”

For more information and/or support visit www.nied.ca