NIED is giving back to the wider community this holiday season and beyond through their Hand Knit Hope initiative.

Hand Knit Hope was started by one of NIED’s early volunteers, Alex, who realized the therapeutic nature of knitting and crocheting through her own Eating Disorder treatment in Toronto. “I started the program because I was inspired by the women I met in treatment,” she says. “We starting knitting in the kitchen together after mealtimes and gifting finished items to new patients coming into the program.”

When Alex started volunteering with NIED she asked founder, Wendy Preskow if they could start the Hand Knit Hope program under the NIED umbrella. “She came up with a logo, created a website and started hosting circles of friends and family just to start knitting or crocheting,” Wendy says. Over the years people ages 6 to 90 have been involved in the program.

The ultimate goal was to donate finished items to people in treatment centres, support groups and anyone on their recovery journey who needed a bit of warmth and love on their path to wellness. The initiative has only grown from there with Wendy and some of her friends and family members knitting hundreds of items a year. The Hand Knit Hope program also expanded into doctors’ and dentists’ offices, with Wendy leaving a knitting basket in waiting rooms, encouraging patients to knit a row while waiting for their appointment. “When we were hosting in-person symposiums we would also speak about our little Hand Knit Hope project and I would take baskets of knitting needles and wool and give to it anybody there who wanted to take it to their doctor or dentist,” Wendy says.

Since the start of Hand Knit Hope Wendy has not stopped knitting and many of her family members and friends have also continued to be dedicated to the initiative. Up until 2019 Wendy was able to send loads of headbands, scarves, neck warmers, and even gloves to treatment centres and programs in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador, British Colombia and Quebec. “It’s amazing to see how the sentiment has grown Canada-wide with NIED,” Alex says.

Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on many Eating Disorder treatment programs across the country. Since the COVID-19 shut down Wendy and another friend of hers have made 100 items each; but they were having a hard time finding a place to send them with many programs closed down, operating virtually or at a limited capacity. “I was sitting with all this stuff and not knowing what to do with it because programs have shut, there are no more outpatient programs, and inpatient programs are collapsing,” she says. “Even in B.C. I spoke to the Looking Glass Foundation the other day and they can accommodate 14 clients in the residential program, however  because of COVID only  up to 6 in order to keep people apart. So then what?”

Fortunately, Wendy was able to reconnect with the Eating Disorder Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador where she sent another parcel of 60 items for them to distribute to the programs that were still running for people with Eating Disorders needing support in their province. Inspired by the season of giving Wendy decided to do something different with the rest of the Hand Knit Hope items and donate them to charities in need outside of the Eating Disorder recovery space. Through NIED’s Executive Director, Michelle D’Amico, she sent 20 items to an organization in Ottawa called Restoring Hope Ministries, which provides a safe space for street-engaged youth aged 16-25.

Wendy then donated over 135 items to Ve’ahavta, a Jewish humanitarian organization that gives food and clothing to homeless people in downtown Toronto. “I don’t want to stop doing do this just because programs are closed, because I just love doing it,” Wendy says. “This is our way of giving back.”

Wendy says Hand Knit Hope is an ongoing project and it is clear that COVID-19 will not stop her or any of the other dedicated volunteers. “As long as I, and a handful of others can continue and create it will not stop,” she says.

If you’re interested in participating, or are in need of a warm comfortable item contact wendy@nied.ca.